Friday

Artist Gallery: Elizabeth Stockton

A recent post on  Fashion Is My Muse made some very thought-provoking points about beauty and its place (or lack thereof) in the art world today.  I rejoice whenever I find an artist who has developed a unique vision appreciative of beauty, and Elizabeth Stockton is one such artist.  Her serene and frequently haunting paintings invite you to look deeply and consider landscape as an expression of emotion.


I appreciate the wonderful serenity of Stockton's paintings - in a world of chaos, she paints an oasis of calm. It is sometimes sad, but it is always quiet. Here's her Artist's Statement:

"I paint landscapes that portray an
emotion as opposed to an actual place.
I appreciate a painting that haunts me
so I never get tired of looking at it and
studying it - one that changes with the
light, the season, placement, and mood.
My paintings evoke an emotion of
peacefulness, awareness, quiet,
and tranquility."


Consider: what is more emotional to you than the landscape in which you grew up? Your home, the yard, the hill behind your house? Or what, really, is America without the Grand Canyon, Italy without her coastline, Switzerland without her mountains? In turn, consider the cultural currents surrounding suburbia and its cul de sacs, or perceptions of inner city violence. Landscape is environment - and it frequently defines those within it.

For further readings on landscape and art, I would highly recommend Simon Schama's book Landscape and Memory, which asks, when we look at a landscape, do we see nature or culture? It's a worthwhile question.


Have a great (and restful!) holiday weekend everyone! You can find out more about this Atlanta based Artist here.

Pic 1: Atlanta Homes Mag. Pic 2 - 4: www.elizabethstockton.com.
 

7 comments:

annechovie said...

Beautiful art....reminds me a bit of Rothko's color field works. Have a wonderful wknd!

Averill said...

Gorgeous. It's funny, but like Anne I was immediately struck by the similarities with Rothko's work -- but more organic, more feminine. In fact, I think I prefer it to Rothko.

Style Redux 2 said...

I agree with both Anne and Averill's astute observations. Wonderful. Atlanta seems to have it all going on, doesn't it?

Sanity Fair said...

Anne and Averill - what a really interesting observation. I immediately thought of Rothko, but didn't make the connection with the feminine feel.

Sanity Fair said...

Style Redux - it's not called Hotlanta for nothing :) We're lucky to have so much in one place.

g. said...

These are gorgeous. The first one is dreamy.

Ingrid Mida said...

The paintings are haunting in the beauty of their stillness.

Disclosure

Shop Hop, Great Steals, and some posts may include paid links. View our disclosure policy here.

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails